Tagged: have a story

9 Reasons Your Band Isn't Getting Press

**Guest post written by Ari Herstand. It originally appeared on Ari's Take and in Digital Music News.

 

"Music reviewers know their audience. The average reader doesn't care how you achieved that guitar tone on the bridge of track 3. But if your lead singer went on a spiritual quest for 9 months in the Amazon and came back with 12 songs written on an invented instrument he made out of found objects in the rainforest, now THAT'S a story! When you write your press release or pitch an article, highlight the most interesting aspects of what makes you stand out..."

Using Story and Storylines to Create Context for Your Content

**Guest post written by Randy Young from the Ottawa based rock band Cherry Suede.

 

"Using storylines to create context for your content boosts its relevance to your audience. The result? More fans, sales, and profits!"

The Music Industry is Dead - Now Let's Move On

**Guest post written by Brandon Seymour, musician, SEO analyst, web designer, and social media marketer.

 

"I know - I'm not the first genius to point out that the music industry is dead. I'm also not the first person to point out that artists have been complaining about this for a very long time. I just can't help but wonder if maybe - just maybe - the music industry needed to die..."

The New Music & Entertainment Business: Easier Than You Think?

**Guest post written by Deuce Ellis, Buffalo-born and Brooklyn-raised rap renegade. Originally posted by Cyber PR.

 

"Here’s My Guest Blog After Attending the #YourMusic Seminar; maybe this whole thing is easier than you think…First things first, let’s demolish whatever train of thought you may have. Demolish it. Let’s destroy and rebuild..."

What's Your Story?

**Guest Post by Bret Alexander of The Badlees and Saturation Acres.

 

"I have always said that the best way to break up a band is to make a record. I’ve seen it a hundred times. A bunch of guys have a rock and roll dream. The band gets all excited and starts diligently writing songs. They save up some money...Then, they do the recording. Then, they put together the artwork. Then, they plan the release party. Then……. About two weeks or so after the release party the phone calls start coming in. The band is depressed. At this point they ask the question that whole empires have risen and fallen on: Now what?"

Great interviews don’t happen by accident

**Guest post written by Bobby Borg, originally from Music Marketing for the DIY Musician.

 

"Great interviews don’t happen by accident. Both parties, the interviewer and the interviewee, need to do a great deal of preliminary research. In fact, preparing your complete interview in writing before the interview can serve as helpful research for the busy interviewer and provide additional content that can be posted on your artist websites..."